Aug 10, 2022  
2020-2021 College Catalog 
    
2020-2021 College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course Naming System:

Course content areas at Tulsa Community College are categorized in “disciplines,” a related group of courses in a specified subject area, such as English (ENGL) or Physics (PHYS). Each course is first assigned a specific discipline name and then a specific four-digit course number, as in ENGL 1113, and a course name, as in Composition I. A brief description of the course content follows the course name and number. If a course is offered as part of a required sequence of courses, the prerequisite requirements for that course are also listed within the catalog course description. Not all courses listed in the catalog are offered each term, and certain courses may be offered on only one campus. Please check the current term class schedule for this information.

Course Numbering System:

  • First digit - The year in which the course is usually taken.*
  • Second and third digit - The individual course number within a discipline.
  • Fourth - The credit hours awarded for a course.

*Exception: Zero-level (non-credit) courses which may be taken in any term, but usually within the first two semesters.

Credit Hour:

A credit hour consists of a one-hour class period per week for 16 weeks per semester, with the exception of laboratories, practicums, or physical education activity classes in which generally two one-hour periods per week for 16 weeks equals one credit hour. The number of class hours and laboratory hours doubles for a class in an eight-week term.  Note: The time required each week for laboratory may vary from course to course. Please refer to the course syllabus for more information.

General Education Courses:

Courses used to fulfill general education requirements at TCC are listed in the catalog section titled, General Education Requirements. A code letter following a course title designates the general education category for which the course may generally be used for transfer to another university, as follows:

(A) Analytical and Quantitative Thought
(D) Diversity
(H) Humanities
(I)  International or Non-Western Dimension
(L) Laboratory Science
(N) Natural Science
(S) Social and Behavioral Sciences

 

Biomedical Equipment Technology

  
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    BMET 2343 - Biomedical Electronics Theory I

    A study of the basic principles by which physiological events are measured. Electronic fundamentals are used to understand electrodes, transducers, amplifiers, and patient monitoring systems. Electrode care and placement and the operation of medical electronic instruments are studied Includes lab component.

    Prerequisite: BMET 1304 , concurrent enrollment, or approval of the associate dean.
  
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    BMET 2353 - Biomedical Electronics Theory II

    A continuation of BMET 2343. An application of the techniques studied in BMET 2343 to measurements made in cardiology, laboratory medicine, and radiology. Theory, operation, and maintenance of equipment used in clinics and hospitals. Testing of equipment used for respiratory and physical therapy will be included. Includes lab component.

    Prerequisites: BMET 2343  and ELET 2244 .
  
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    BMET 2373 - Biomedical Electronics Clinical

    Supervised practical experience in cooperating hospitals, and/or Biomedical Service Centers, which encompass a study of techniques used in repair of medical equipment.

    Prerequisites: BMET 2343  and concurrent enrollment in BMET 2353 
  
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    BMET 2990 - Selected Topics in Biomedical Equipment Technology

    The study and/or analysis of a selected topic in Biomedical Equipment Technology. May be repeated with a different topic.


Biotechnology

  
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    BIOT 1113 - Introduction to Biotechnology

    Career exploration, history, and applications of DNA/RNA technology, safe laboratory practices, bioinformatics tools, calculations for solution preparation, and current lab techniques will be investigated. Includes lab component.

  
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    BIOT 1314 - Biotechnology Laboratory Methods and Techniques

    Laboratory operations, management, equipment, instrumentation, quality control techniques, and safety procedures.  Lectures on biochemistry, bioorganic topics and the scientific method, including design of assays for RNA, DNA, enzymes and protein.  Includes lab component.

    Prerequisites:  BIOT 1113 , BIOL 1224  and CHEM 1315  with a grade of “C” or better.  Courses may be taken concurrently.
    Semester Offered Spring
  
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    BIOT 1533 - Cell Culture Techniques

    Introduces students to lab techniques used to culture mammalian cells. Topics include aseptic technique, subculture, quantitation, cryopreservation, transfection, and cytotoxicity.  Course includes an embedded research project. Includes lab component.

    Prerequisites: BIOT 1113  and BIOL 1224  .  Courses may be taken concurrently with this course.
    Semester Offered Spring
  
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    BIOT 2101 - Biotechnology Quality Assurance

    Regulatory issues that govern quality assurance and quality control in a biotechnology setting will be explored.  Online course. 

    Prerequisite: BIOT 1113 .
    Semester Offered Spring
  
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    BIOT 2202 - Applied Bioscience Research

    Extraction, amplification, and transformation of a gene with subsequent digital analysis will be investigated.  Results will be shared in a scientific forum. Includes lab component.

    Prerequisites: BIOT 1113  or BIOL 1224  or instructor approval.
  
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    BIOT 2245 - Molecular Biology and Techniques

    DNA and RNA manipulations using current molecular tools will be investigated in lecture and lab.  Includes lab component.

    Prerequisites: BIOL 1224  , BIOT 1113   and BIOT 1533   with grades of “C” or better. Also CHEM 1315 , but can be taken concurrently with this course. 
    Semester Offered Fall
  
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    BIOT 2334 - Biotechnology Proteomics and Instrumentation

    Theory, applications, and operation of instruments with emphasis on protein purification in both an R&D laboratory and a biomanufacturing facility.  An introduction to protein bioinformatics tools is included.  Calibration of instruments, quantitative and qualitative analysis by chromatography, protein and enzyme assays, spectrophotometry, and SDS-PAGE gel analysis.  Includes lab component.

    Prerequisites: BIOT 1533  and CHEM 1415  with a grade of “C” or better. Courses may be taken concurrently.
    Semester Offered Spring
  
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    BIOT 2513 - Biotechnology Internship

    An experience for an advanced biotechnolgy student.  Students will be mentored/supervised by a designated faculty member to complete a research project. Special permission is required to enroll. 

    Prerequisites: BIOT 1533   
  
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    BIOT 2990 - Selected Topics in Biotechnology

    The study and/or analysis of a selected topic in Biotechnology. May be repeated with a different topic.


Business

  
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    BUSN 1053 - Introduction to Business

    Provides overall picture of business operation: includes analysis of specialized fields within business organizations; identifies role of business in modern society.

  
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    BUSN 1353 - Business Mathematics

    Utilizes mathematical operations to solve practical business application problems. Includes a review of basic mathematics and percentages, discounts, and price change calculations.  Payroll, banking and finance applications will be covered. Microsoft Excel will be used and additional topics include installment buying, mortgages, taxes, insurance, analysis of financial statements and inventory costs.

  
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    BUSN 2053 - Intercultural Communication (H,I)

    An introductory course in intercultural communication; the study of communication among people from different cultures. Emphasis is on increasing students’ understanding of cultural theories of communication and cultural issues that affect communication effectiveness especially in educational and business contexts.

    Crosslisted with COMM 2053 .
  
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    BUSN 2433 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship

    A focus on the entrepreneurial mindset and the process of launching and growing a new business. Students will review opportunities, innovation, new value creation, business context, existing firms, and any area of business or life that pertains to entrepreneurship.

  
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    BUSN 2503 - Principles of Project Management

    An introduction to the basic theory and principles of project management. Emphasis is on the major Process Groups of Initiating, Planning, Executing, Controlling and Closing and how the steps interrelate during the project life cycle. Students will expand their knowledge and increase their aptitude in the use of the interpersonal skills needed to participate in a team-based environment. Through a hands-on approach, students will develop teamwork, leadership, ethical and communication skills required, as well as techniques for building trust and resolving conflicts with project participants.

    Semester Offered Fall
  
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    BUSN 2513 - Project Management Applications

    Students will learn to use the essential technologies of project management. The student will develop skills in the efficient and effective use of industry standard software to create, coordinate, and communicate project information. Mobile tools such as laptops and handheld devices will be employed to acclimate students to today’s real-time project management environment. Emphasis will be on the use of project management principles in case studies and real-world examples.

    Prerequisite: BUSN 2503  and CSCI 1203  or instructor approval
    Semester Offered Spring 
  
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    BUSN 2523 - Project Management Certification Preparation

    Preparation for certification exams offered by the Project Management Institute (PMI®). Meets the Project Management Institute’s educational requirements for the Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM®) exam and the Project Management Professional (PMP®) exam. Case studies, scenarios, and real-world examples will be utilized. CAPM®, PMP® and PMI® are registered trademarks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

    Prerequisite: BUSN 2503  or instructor approval.
    Semester Offered Spring
  
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    BUSN 2633 - Industrial and Organizational Psychology (S)

    An application of the principles of psychology to the problems of business and industry. Special attention will be given to the areas of communication, motivation, job satisfaction, and personnel selection, placement, and training.

    Prerequisite: PSYC 1113  or PSYC 1313 . Crosslisted with PSYC 2633 .
  
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    BUSN 2990 - Selected Topics in Business

    The study and/or analysis of a selected topic in Business. May be repeated with a different topic.


Cardiovascular Technology

  
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    CVTC 1003 - Introduction to Cardiovascular Technology

    An introduction to the field of cardiovascular technology. Topics include patient history, physical assessment, communication, ethics, and documentation. Special emphasis will be placed on the principles of radiation safety, sterile technique, cardiac monitoring, and arterial hemostasis.

    Prerequisite: Acceptance to CVT Program
  
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    CVTC 1013 - Cardiovascular Anatomy and Physiology

    The study of the anatomy, physiology, and structural composition of the heart and vascular systems. Topics include cardiac embryology, coronary arteries, valves, electrical conduction system, hemodynamics, peripheral vascular system, and interpretation of 12 lead EKG

    Prerequisite: Acceptance to CVT Program
  
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    CVTC 1023 - Cardiovascular Pharmacology

    Covers the basic fundamentals of cardiovascular pharmacology and the most frequently used medications in the cardiovascular setting. Topics include the basic principles of drug receptors, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, calculations, routes of administration, and emergency medications used in the cath lab.

    Prerequisites: CVTC 1003 CVTC 1013    Corequisite: CVTC 1034 CVTC 1044  
  
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    CVTC 1034 - Cardiovascular Skills Practicum

    A practicum course designed to acquaint the student to the clinical cardiovascular setting in a simulated environment. The course is an introduction to the various cardiovascular procedural areas providing a comprehensive understanding of the field of cardiology, x-ray physics, imaging, cardiographic angiography, and fluorography. An emphasis will be placed on establishing and maintaining a sterile field.

    Prerequisite: CVTC 1003 ;CVTC 1013   Corequisite:  CVTC 1023 CVTC 1044  
  
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    CVTC 1044 - Cardiovascular Pathophysiology

    Prepares the cardiovascular technology student to identify the pathological processes and congenital defects of the cardiovascular system. Topics will include infective endocarditis and rheumatic heart disease, coronary artery disease, pericardial disease, valvular heart disease, heart failure, cardiogenic shock, hypertension, murmurs and congenital abnormalities. Disorders of the conduction system will also be covered, including SA node, AV node, and ventricular arrhythmias.

    Prerequisite: CVTC 1003  ; CVTC 1013   Corequisite: CVTC 1023 CVTC 1034  
  
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    CVTC 1063 - Clinical Practicum I

    This course provides an introduction to the cardiovascular clinical environment. The learner will focus on the elements of patient care, the patient-technologist relationship, and the professional relationship between the physician and the cardiovascular healthcare team. Students are assigned to clinical experiences in local hospitals in addition to on-campus lecture and laboratory sessions

    Prerequisite: CVTC 1023 CVTC 1034 CVTC 1044   
  
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    CVTC 2103 - Invasive Procedures I

    Designed to prepare the student to enter the invasive cardiovascular field. Introduces the construction and purpose of specialized equipment and its role in invasive procedures. Topics will include invasive cardiovascular equipment, specialized equipment and cardiac pacemaker and defibrillator implantation. Includes lab component.

    Prerequisite: CVTC 1003 CVTC 1013 CVTC 1023 ;  CVTC 1034 CVTC 1044 CVTC 1063  
  
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    CVTC 2125 - Clinical Practicum II

    Clinical experience is provided in the cardiac catheterization laboratory setting. The student will gain valuable hands-on experience in the areas of scrubbing, circulating, recording, pre- and post-procedure care and manipulating imaging equipment.

    Prerequisite: CVTC 1003 CVTC 1013 CVTC 1023 CVTC 1034 CVTC 1044 CVTC 1063  
  
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    CVTC 2133 - Invasive Procedures II

    Continues the advanced study of invasive cardiac medical electronics and instrumentation. Emphasis will be placed on advanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures including intravascular ultrasound, coronary artery blood flow, atherectomy, laser and RF ablation techniques. Cardiovascular support systems, such as intra-aortic balloon pump and internal LV assist devices will be introduced. The basics of intracardiac mapping for electrophysiology studies will be explained. Includes lab component.

    Prerequisite: CVTC 1003 CVTC 1023 CVTC 1034 CVTC 1044 CVTC 1063 CVTC 2103 CVTC 2125   
  
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    CVTC 2145 - Clinical Practicum III

    A laboratory course designed to provide a continuation of the clinical practicum. An emphasis will be placed on refining skills used in specific diagnostic tests, the calculation of hemodynamic data, and professional performance in the clinical environment.  

    Prerequisite: CVTC 1003 CVTC 1013 CVTC 1023 CVTC 1034 CVTC 1044 CVTC 1063 CVTC 2103 CVTC 2125  

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 1114 - Principles of Chemistry (L)

    A course for science majors. Does not substitute for CHEM 1315. Principles, concepts and theories of chemistry are examined and applied to a variety of topics such as chemical bonding, chemical reactions, states of matter, solutions, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The descriptive chemistry of some common elements and compounds is included. Includes lab component.

    Prerequisite: MATH 0013  or appropriate placement test score.
  
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    CHEM 1134 - General, Organic and Biological Chemistry

    For Dental Hygiene students. This is a comprehensive course that briefly covers general and organic chemistry with a focus on biological chemistry and its application to the dental hygiene profession. Atomic structure, chemical bonding, intermolecular forces, solutions, acids and bases, functional groups, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, and metabolism will be covered. Course includes lab and covers general, organic, and biochemistry.

    Prerequisite:  MATH 0013  or appropriate placement test score.
  
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    CHEM 1315 - General Chemistry I (L)

    Designed for science and science-related majors. The course includes the fundamental laws and theories dealing with the structure and interactions of matter and the use of these principles in understanding the properties of matter, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, the physical states of matter, changes of state, and solutions. The fundamental principles are applied to the solution of quantitative problems relating to chemistry. Includes lab component.

    Prerequisite: MATH 1513  or MATH 1715  or equivalent with a grade of “C” or better.
  
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    CHEM 1365 - General Chemistry for Engineers

    Survey course for mechanical engineering students needing only one semester of chemistry. Includes thermodynamics, atomic structure, solid state, materials, equilibria, acids and bases, and electrochemistry. Course may serve as a substitute for CHEM 1315 and/or CHEM 1415 in engineering programs only.  Students should seek advisement regarding transferability before enrollment.  Includes lab component.

    Prerequisite: MATH 1513  with a grade of “C” or better or equivalent. 
  
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    CHEM 1415 - General Chemistry II (L)

    Designed for science and science-related majors, this course is a continuation of CHEM 1315. The fundamental concepts introduced previously, together with additional ones, are applied to solutions, colloids, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. Qualitative inorganic analysis is included in the laboratory work.

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1315  with a grade of “C” or better.
  
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    CHEM 2145 - Organic Chemistry I (L)

    A study of fundamental concepts of organic structure and bonding, reactions of principal functional groups, mechanisms, and nomenclature of hydrocarbons and their derivatives. Laboratory emphasis is on purification, separation, synthesis and instrumental methods of studying organic systems. Includes lab component.

    Prerequisite: CHEM 1415 .
  
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    CHEM 2245 - Organic Chemistry II (L)

    A continuation of CHEM 2145, reactions of principal functional groups and mechanisms. Laboratory emphasis is on synthesis and organic qualitative analysis. Includes lab component.

    Prerequisite: CHEM 2145 .
  
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    CHEM 2990 - Selected Topics in Chemistry

    The study and/or analysis of a selected topic in Chemistry. May be repeated with a different topic.


Child Development

  
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    CHLD 2003 - Child Development in the Lifespan

    This course focuses on the study of child development beginning with conception and continuing through the significant age periods of human life. Students will study the principles of development, developmental theories and the dynamics of development within the context of the cultural, societal, and family environments. Assigned field experiences.

    Prerequisites: Criminal History and Sex Offender Registry background check. 
  
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    CHLD 2023 - Child Development and Parenting

    A systems perspective of child development and parenting with an emphasis on the ecological approach. Course will include the study of family processes, parenting philosophies, styles, and techniques. Assigned field experiences.

  
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    CHLD 2032 - Early Field Experience in Teaching - Early Childhood

    For students who are considering becoming a teacher in early childhood (Kindergarten - 3rd grade). Involves activities completed outside of the college classroom which correlate to and supplement classroom content.  Field experiences include: group tours of public school settings; observations in a classroom setting; tutoring students; reading to students; and interviewing teachers.  Introduces the field of early childhood education, including standards, diversity, Developmentally Appropriate Practice, professionalism, and ethics.

    Prerequisites: Completed information sheet and a Criminal History and Sex Offender Registry background check clearance.
  
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    CHLD 2042 - Early Field Experience in Teaching - Elementary

    This course is for students who are considering teaching as a career. Students who are interested in becoming a teacher in elementary (1st-8th grade) should enroll in this class. Students are placed in a school setting where they complete 32 hours interacting, tutoring, mentoring, and helping children with school related learning. This is a blended online, on-campus, lab course and requires a two hour on-campus orientation the first Friday of the semester. Students are required to complete written assignments both online and in the school classroom where they are assigned.

    Prerequisites: Completed information sheet and a Criminal History and Sex Offender Registry background check clearance.
  
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    CHLD 2103 - Child Guidance

    Presents the theoretical basis for the use of constructive child guidance and discipline techniques in programs serving children. Students learn observational methods and behavior analysis to help determine the most appropriate guidance techniques and understand the impact of development on children’s behavior.  Assigned field experiences facilitate the acquisition of observational skills and provide models for discussion and learning child guidance and classroom management skills.

  
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    CHLD 2113 - Introduction to Child Care Management

    Provides an overview of how to effectively manage child care programs. A focus on relevant and current issues, integrating knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives in early education is presented. Licensing requirements, staff management and conflict resolution are addressed. Students will learn how to to use developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments. A basic introduction to child care budgets and finances is addressed. Highlights the benefits of establishing positive and supportive relationships with children, families and community. Assigned field experiences.

    Semester Offered Fall
  
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    CHLD 2203 - Child and Family in the Community

    Focus on contemporary societal factors including diversity, culture, and family structures as they relate to children in various childcare programs. Ethics, professionalism, and skills development for child development and human services professionals will be addressed. Emphasis on promoting optimum development and support of families and children within programs and the larger community. Assigned field experiences.

  
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    CHLD 2213 - Children with Special Needs

    This course will focus on the principles and practices of facilitating learning for children with special needs. A primary objective is to make practical application to healthy learning environments for all children. Legislative issues, inclusion, early intervention, developmentally appropriate strategies, advocacy, and parental involvement will be addressed. Assigned field experiences.

  
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    CHLD 2233 - Physical Development and Creative Expression: Birth to Eight

    Study of creativity, play, and motor development with appropriate experiences in play, music, art, and motor skills for children, birth to eight years. Assigned field experiences.

    Prerequisites: Criminal History and Sex Offender Registry background check.
  
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    CHLD 2243 - Language and Cognitive Development: Birth to Eight

    Study of language and cognitive development with consideration of appropriate experiences in literacy, numeracy, and science for children birth to eight years. Assigned field experiences.

    Prerequisites: Criminal History and Sex Offender Registry background check.
    Semester Offered Spring
  
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    CHLD 2253 - Child Development Practicum

    The practicum is the culminating experience for the Child Development student. Practicum site placements will be individualized based on the student’s degree option. Students will interact with children and/or families teaching appropriate curriculum and activities. A portfolio of previously completed course work will be compiled by each student to document student knowledge, skills and abilities as they relate to the NAEYC associate degree standards for early childhood education.

    Prerequisites: Criminal History and Sex Offender Registry background check and CHLD 2003 , completed with a grade of “C” or better. This course cannot be taken concurrently with CHLD 2513 .
    Semester Offered Spring
  
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    CHLD 2263 - Social and Emotional Development: Birth to Eight

    Study of social and emotional development and appropriate experience for children birth to eight years. Assigned field experiences.

    Prerequisites: Criminal History and Sex Offender Registry background check.
    Semester Offered Fall
  
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    CHLD 2413 - Professionalism & Leadership in Early Care & Education

    Course presents an in depth study of professionalism and leadership topics meaningful to early care and education directors, principals, and teachers. The profession of early childhood education and what it means to be a professional will be studied. The NAEYC Standards, Position Statements, and Code of Ethical Conduct will be reviewed and discussed. Relevant current issues, advocacy, integration of knowledge, reflective practice, intentional teaching, and critical perspectives in early education will be presented. The class includes a professional NAEYC Standards based self-assessment and a planning form for setting goals and charting one’s own professional development in the field of early care and education.

    Semester Offered Fall
  
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    CHLD 2513 - Programming for Infants and Toddlers

    This course will focus on developmental theories as they relate to infant and toddler development and behavior. Students will study infant and toddler care-giving routines as opportunities for facilitating development through focus on individuality and responsiveness. Developmentally appropriate environmental and interaction practices, including health and safety, will be addressed. Course includes a lab component.

    Prerequisites: Criminal History and Sex Offender Registry background check. CHLD 2003  with a grade of “C” or better and all previous CHLD coursework with a grade of “C” or better. 
  
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    CHLD 2613 - Health, Safety, and Nutrition: Birth to Eight

    Examines health, safety, and nutrition practices in early childhood programs. Topics include: state child care licensing standards, common medical conditions affecting children’s health, the infectious process and environmental control, safety management and injury prevention, planning for children’s health and safety education, nutritional guidelines, child malnutrition, child obesity, immunizations, emergency response procedures, and children with special medical needs. Emphasizes the importance of respecting and partnering with families to help children establish healthy lifestyles and achieve their learning potential. Assigned field experiences.

  
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    CHLD 2990 - Selected Topics in Child Development

    The study and/or analysis of selected topics in child development. May be repeated with a different topic. Field experiences in topic-related settings may be required beyond the normal class hours.


Chinese

  
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    CHNS 1103 - Chinese I

    An elementary course in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese. The first in a sequence of related courses.

  
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    CHNS 1213 - Chinese II

    Continued instruction in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese.

    Prerequisite: CHNS 1103  with a grade of “C” or better or approval of instructor.
  
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    CHNS 2990 - Selected Topics in Chinese

    The study and/or analysis of a selected topic in Chinese. May be repeated with a different topic.


College Experience

  
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    COLL 1002 - First Year Experience Seminar

    This student success course is for all new to college, degree-seeking students.  Students are oriented to TCC campuses and college services, with an emphasis on personal and social strategies to increase involvement in college and community activities.  The course requires students to analyze and apply study techniques and behavior patterns essential to college success, apply critical and creative thinking skills to solve academic and social problems, and construct goals and time plans to balance work, school, and family.

  
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    COLL 1003 - College Success

    Students will explore evidence-based strategies that will help them succeed in their individual courses, academic programs, and personal goals. The opportunity to work with a community partner will help students reflect on the needs of our community, the value of volunteer work, and the desire to be a part of it. Students will also explore humanities themes by reading and participating in activities around a common text. 

  
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    COLL 1101 - Orientation to U.S. Higher Education

    Orientates F1-visa international students to the U.S. higher education system. Provides a thorough review of F1-visa regulations, focuses on the unique learning environment common to U.S. higher education, and connects students to the institution’s learning support laboratories and student services. 


Communication

  
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    COMM 1113 - Public Speaking

    An introductory course in oral communication, emphasis is on improving applied communication skills. Special attention is given to critical thinking skills and the anatomy of the communication process: audience analysis, research, organization, logic, ethical use of evidence, delivery, and listening.

    Required for B.A. and B.S. degrees in most professional majors; i.e. Business, Law, Education, Medical, English.

  
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    COMM 2053 - Intercultural Communication (H) (I)

    An introductory course in intercultural communication: the study of communication among people from different cultures. Emphasis is on increasing students’ understanding of cultural theories of communication and of cultural issues that affect communication effectiveness especially in educational and business contexts.

    Crosslisted with BUSN 2053 .
  
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    COMM 2073 - Oral Interpretation

    Oral Interpretation combines communication concepts and skills with dual goals of helping the student to understand basic communication principles and improving oral communication skills. Special emphasis is placed on preparing, selecting, organizing, and delivering literary works as well as on analyzing and evaluating the performance process.

  
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    COMM 2093 - Leadership and Professional Communication

    A study of the principles and theories of business and professional communication. Students will address a variety of questions that arise from the intersection of public, professional life and the academic study of rhetoric/communication.

  
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    COMM 2103 - Interpersonal Communication

    A study of the principles and theories of communication in dyadic (one-to-one) and human interactive situations. Emphasis will be on increasing student awareness of verbal and nonverbal communication behavior. Focus will be directed toward improving interpersonal communication skills.

  
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    COMM 2243 - Small Group Communication

    A study of theories and principles related to small group communication. Emphasis on the communication dynamics involved in group relationships, group decision making processes, and group leadership in both professional and personal contexts. Students become better group members and learn how to facilitate effective collaboration among members of a group.

  
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    COMM 2333 - Forensics

    This course is open to all students. Participation includes preparation, practice, class performances and competitions. Students will perform various individual events including oral interpretation events (dramatic and humorous interpretation, interpretation of prose and poetry, and duo interpretation) and platform speaking events (persuasive and informative speaking, impromptu and extemporaneous speaking, after dinner speaking, communication analysis, Student Congress, Parli-Debate, and Lincoln Douglas debate). The student must compete with the TCC Forensic Team and travel to at least two regional competitions throughout the semester. This class is available for credit to both majors and non-majors.

  
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    COMM 2343 - Forensics Performance Competition

    This course is open to all students. Participation includes preparation, practice, class performances and competitions. Students will perform various individual events including oral interpretation events (dramatic and humorous interpretation, interpretation of prose and poetry, and duo interpretation) and platform speaking events (persuasive and informative speaking, impromptu and extemporaneous speaking, after dinner speaking, communication analysis, Student Congress, Parli-Debate, and Lincoln Douglas debate). The student must compete with the TCC Forensic Team and travel to at least three regional competitions throughout the semester. This class is available for credit to both majors and non-majors.

  
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    COMM 2351 - Forensics Competition Practicum

    This course is open to all students. Participation includes preparation, practice, class performances and competitions. Students will perform various individual events including oral interpretation events (dramatic and humorous interpretation, interpretation of prose and poetry, and duo interpretation) and platform speaking events (persuasive and informative speaking, impromptu and extemporaneous speaking, after dinner speaking, communication analysis, Student Congress, Parli-Debate, and Lincoln Douglas debate). The student must compete with the TCC Forensic Team and travel to at least three regional competitions throughout the semester. This class is available for credit to both majors and non-majors.

  
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    COMM 2353 - Forensics II

    This course is open to all students. Participation includes preparation, practice, class performances and competitions. Students will perform various individual events including oral interpretation events (dramatic and humorous interpretation, interpretation of prose and poetry, and duo interpretation) and platform speaking events (persuasive and informative speaking, impromptu and extemporaneous speaking, after dinner speaking, communication analysis, Student Congress, Parli-Debate, and Lincoln Douglas debate). The student must compete with the TCC Forensic Team and travel to at least three regional competitions throughout the semester. This class is available for credit to both majors and non-majors.

  
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    COMM 2373 - Forensics IV

    This course is open to all students. Participation includes preparation, practice, class performances and competitions. Students will perform various individual events including oral interpretation events (dramatic and humorous interpretation, interpretation of prose and poetry, and duo interpretation) and platform speaking events (persuasive and informative speaking, impromptu and extemporaneous speaking, after dinner speaking, communication analysis, Student Congress, Parli-Debate, and Lincoln Douglas debate). The student must compete with the TCC Forensic Team and travel to at least three regional competitions throughout the semester. This class is available for credit to both majors and non-majors.

  
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    COMM 2503 - Contemporary Issues in Communication

    A survey of theories designed to explain how humans interact. Includes verbal, nonverbal, interpersonal, small group, organizational, political, intercultural, and mass communication.

    Prerequisite: COMM 1113 .
  
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    COMM 2990 - Selected Topics in Communication

    The study and/or analysis of a selected topic in Communication. May be repeated with a different topic.


Computer Information Systems

  
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    CSCI 1011 - Introduction to Personal Computers

    This class for the complete novice is designed to eliminate the fear of computers and introduce the Windows environment plus word processing, spreadsheet, and database programs. Hands-on sessions on the personal computer will help the student gain confidence in using the computer.

  
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    CSCI 1203 - Computer Concepts and Applications

    A theory/applications course on operating systems, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation software, cybersecurity and Information Systems. Emphasis is placed upon decision making with spreadsheets and databases. It will serve as the first course to be completed by any computer science major, may satisfy a computer science requirement for another discipline, is a university transferable course and meets the computer proficiency requirements mandated by the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education.

  
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    CSCI 1263 - Network Fundamentals

    This first course in the network curriculum provides a general introduction to networking. Topics will include an overview of the hardware and software needed for network connectivity including personal computer operating systems, network media and topology, network card configuration and installation, communication protocols and standards. This course provides for hands-on interaction with network related hardware and software. The focus will include coverage of Comp TIA’S objectives for the Network+ certification exam.

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1203  or instructor approval. Recommended: CSYS 2023  and CSCI 2143 .
  
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    CSCI 1273 - Customer Support

    Designed to show how customer support positions provide guidance and assistance in both consulting and troubleshooting roles within a helpdesk environment. Guidance in educating the user community based upon current hardware/software products. Understanding the importance of developing a better understanding of a customer’s business environment and troubleshooting/resolving the customer’s problems as quickly as possible. Develop troubleshooting and problem solving techniques to distinguish between communication vs. equipment hardware/software problems and be able to effectively communicate with non-technical users over the telephone.

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1263  
  
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    CSCI 1483 - Introduction to UNIX (Linux)

    An introduction to UNIX operating system with specific reference to UNIX commands, the UNIX file structure, editors, and shell programming. Includes an introduction to system administration and security.

    Prerequisites: CSCI 1203  or instructor approval.
  
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    CSCI 1901 - Beginning UNIX (Linux)

    A practical introduction to the UNIX operating system, with emphasis on creating and manipulating files and using basic commands. Includes an introduction to shell programming.

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1011  or instructor approval.
  
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    CSCI 2013 - Word

    This course offers an in-depth coverage of the concepts and techniques required to create complex documents for business use and to assist in the preparation for the Microsoft Office Specialist Word expert exam.

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1203  or instructor approval.
  
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    CSCI 2033 - Excel

    This course provides advanced coverage of spreadsheets including an introduction to data analysis, dashboards, and data visualization. Emphasis is placed on solving business-related problems and to assist in the preparation for the Microsoft Office Specialist Excel expert exam.

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1203  or instructor approval.
  
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    CSCI 2043 - Access

    This course covers the topics required to create, update, and query a database and generate reports and to assist in the preparation necessary for the Microsoft Office Specialist Access core exam.

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1203  or instructor approval.
  
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    CSCI 2133 - Introduction to JAVA

    An introduction to how Java language is used to develop highly portable applications and applets. Topics will include data objects exceptions, threads, and the Abstract Windows Toolkit.

    Prerequisites: CSYS 1203  and CSCI 2473  or CSCI 2843  or instructor approval.
  
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    CSCI 2143 - A+ II

    This course deals with the most current Windows operating systems, Mac OS and Linux. Topics include installation, maintenance and common features. Introduction to virtualization, security, common threats, vulnerabilities and preventative methods will be covered, along with software troubleshooting, tools and best practices. Occupational procedures will include safety, environmental concerns, ethics, professionalism and troubleshooting theory. This course will prepare the student to take and pass the second of the two required CompTIA exams to gain A+ certification. As the Comp TIA exam is modified to meet industry needs, this course will also be modified to cover the new topics in the exam

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1203  or instructor approval.
  
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    CSCI 2163 - Windows Operating Systems

    This course covers a state-of-the-art operating system environment. Major areas to be studied will include coverage of installation procedures, customizing desktops, security issues, file management, network/internet connectivity, managing programs/hardware/digital media, maximizing performance, and some troubleshooting techniques.

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1203 .
  
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    CSCI 2473 - C Language

    The C programming language is presented with emphasis on applications as a portable, “mid-level” language. The student will write several programs utilizing the important features of C such as functions, structures, pointers, recursion and bit-operations. Students should have a working knowledge of the operating system in which they will be interacting.

    Prerequisite: CSYS 1203  or instructor approval.
  
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    CSCI 2483 - PowerPoint / Multimedia

    This course provides comprehensive coverage of the concepts and techniques to create presentations suitable for professional purposes, to understand the underlying functionality of presentation software, and to assist in the preparation for the Microsoft Office Specialist PowerPoint comprehensive exam.

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1203  or instructor approval.
  
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    CSCI 2683 - Data Structures

    Advanced programming techniques and concepts using the C programming language. Topics will include algorithm analysis and design, memory management, software engineering concepts and standard data structures including linked lists and binary trees.

    Prerequisite: CSCI 2473  or instructor approval.
  
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    CSCI 2783 - Advanced UNIX (Linux)

    Continued instruction in the UNIX operating system, including system administration functions. Emphasis will be placed on setting up and maintaining file systems, networks, devices, and users. This course helps prepare the student to take the current CompTIA Linux + certification exam.

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1483  or instructor approval.
  
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    CSCI 2843 - C++ Programming Language

    Programming techniques in object-oriented programming, including data abstraction, inheritance, polymorphism, and dynamic object creation. Emphasis will be placed on the reusability of objects and the focus on object concepts as they deal with future program maintenance.

    Prerequisite: CSYS 1203  and CSCI 2473  or instructor approval.
  
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    CSCI 2983 - Information Technology Capstone/Internship

    The Information Technology Capstone/Internship is designed to assist students in developing the specialized skills necessary to succeed in a business or corporate setting. The course can include working at a company as an intern, creating a project assigned by faculty, developing a portfolio that contains the projects completed from course work and/or a Capstone project. Students will be under the supervision of faculty. Students will spend 12 hours per week at an internship site or working on a project.

    Prerequisites: Students must have completed 75% of their curricular requirements, completed the application process, and obtained instructor permission to enroll.
  
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    CSCI 2990 - Selected Topics in Computer Science

    The study and/or analysis of a selected topic in Computer Science. May be repeated with a different topic.

  
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    CSYS 1013 - HTML and CSS

    Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) will be presented along with the introductory principles of website design. Projects will include the creation of a variety of different types of web pages and websites, advocating accessibility and efficiency principles and techniques.

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1203 .
  
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    CSYS 1203 - Introduction to Computer Programming

    This course is a required prerequisite for all programming classes and will serve as an introduction to structured programming techniques. Topics to be covered include flowcharting, pseudo code, sequence, selection, iteration, arrays, I/O, principles of problem solving, debugging, documentation and good programming practice. Topics will be applied using an appropriate programming language.

    Prerequisite: CSCI 1203  or concurrent enrollment.
  
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    CSYS 1211 - Introduction to MAC OS

    This course is a hands-on introduction to the MacIntosh operating system. The student will learn to setup and configure as well as launch and run multiple applications in the Mac environment. Basic features and operations performed in Mac applications will be demonstrated and practiced, including file management techniques.

    Semester Offered Fall and Spring
  
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    CSYS 1393 - Web Design and Marketing

    Introduction to website creation and marketing related to E-Commerce business. Topics may include market research, usability issues, and design guidelines, including importance of logos, psychology of color, product promotion and cost factors. Develop and test a website using web development software.

    Crosslisted with MKTG 1393 .
  
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    CSYS 1443 - Electronic Commerce

    This course will examine the foundation, operation and implications of the Internet economy. Course content may include such topics as Internet technologies, privacy, security, online market mechanisms, interaction with customers, electronic publishing, electronic shopping, knowledge-based products, pricing in the Internet economy, database issues, online auctions and e-marketplaces, intellectual property, policies, ethics for the Internet economy, emerging technologies and an outlook for the new economy.

    Crosslisted with MKTG 1443 .
  
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    CSYS 1793 - Mobile Development - iPhone

    A hands-on introduction to designing, developing, debugging and testing mobile applications using Objective C and targeting the iPhone mobile device. Among the topics to be covered: using Core Graphics and Core Animation to customize UI components, using the iPhone’s built-in accelerometers, and integrating your application with other iPhone applications and services.

    Prerequisite: CSCI 2473  or instructor approval.
 

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